After plunging the Roman Republic into civil war in January of 49 BC, Julius Caesar returned to Rome triumphant. It is claimed that his legions killed almost two million people in fifty decisive battles during his campaign against the Republic. On his return, he was hailed a hero by the general public, but the Roman senate was now cast under shadows of worry and fear – a sentiment that was strong enough for them to plot Caesar’s assassination. The assassination of Julius Caesar is arguably one of most significant incidents in ancient Roman history. It led to some historic repercussions and triggered a chain of events that oversaw the transition of contemporary Roman Republic into the Roman Empire. Here is a list of top 10 [&hellip

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Born in 384 BC in Stagira, a small town on the northern coast of Greece, Aristotle’s is arguably one of the most well-known figures in the history of ancient Greece. He was a popular pupil of famous ancient Greek philosopher Plato. But unlike Plato and Socrates, Aristotle displayed an instinct to conclude about his study of nature using scientific and factual reasoning – a trait his predecessors routinely discarded in favor of their philosophical discerns. Perhaps it was his unyielding fascination for nature, logic and reason that he went on to make some pivotal contributions that are still reflected today in modern day mathematics, metaphysics, physics, biology, botany, politics, medicine and many more. He truly earns the honor of being called the “First Teacher” in [&hellip

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When we go a couple of millennia back, ancient Rome ruled over much of Europe, Africa, and western Asia. The formidable might and efficiency of ancient Roman military played a pivotal role in the rapid expansion of contemporary Roman civilization. A part of the Roman military power, the Roman legions formed the largest units in the Roman army. Each legion consisted of around 3000 well-trained men during the early republic days. This number was later expanded to adjust up to 5200 men in each legion during the Imperial era. A typical Roman legion would have 10 cohorts (about 5000 men). This changed around the second half of the first century when the number was kept at nine cohorts of standard size. Each legion was then [&hellip

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The ancient Roman legions played a key role in rapid expansion and scaling of contemporary Roman civilization. An average Roman soldier was trained to fight in a formation of about 5000 fellow warriors – every such group forming up a Roman legion. Such disciplined fighting tactic played a crucial role in crushing their opponents in battles. It also helped that the Roman infantry came equipped with an armory that served for quick offense and also provided a solid defense. Call it an irony, but however standardized and disciplined ancient Roman military tactics were, any such general criterion was absent in their military armor and attire. Here is a list of top 10 ancient Roman armor and costume. 10. Belts The ancient Romans called it the [&hellip

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Power hungry humankind has always been searching for the perfect arsenal. Empires carved out in history were often a result of strategic planning, political ingenuity and the most sophisticated warfare of their times. The selection of weapons at times proved to be the extra edge to win the battle or be slaughtered on the field. The lands of the earth have been bleeding from one century to another, the only difference has been the styles and choice of the weapon wielded. Note: This article has few modern weapons. We decided to use both Ancient and Modern Weapons to make it more interesting.  10. Roman Scissor Specification of the Weapon Length: 18 in Weight: 5 Lbs Configuration: Hardened Steel Used by: Roman Gladiators The Scissor is a rather [&hellip

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